Explosive New Book Based On Indian Idol

By | August 12, 2015

Explosive New Book Based on Indian Idol

by

Vaughn Alaine-Marshall

The smash hit reality show Indian Idol will be in its 5th year in 2010, and already calls for auditions and the excitement is already building for the auditions which are scheduled to be held in August 2010.

It s time for the reality-show behemoth to roll through Indian metropolitans again in search of the next voice that will capture the imagination of viewers all over India. However, is what you see really what you get? Vaughn Alaine-Marshall, an Australian author, exposes the Idol world in his new book Uberstar a must have for all those wanting to a shot at fame in one of India s biggest television shows.

Uberstar is a fictitious book based upon real events. The stories within Uberstar were taken from Idol contestants, producers and insiders from all over the world including India. In his research Alaine-Marshall spoke to several Indian Idol contestants, many of whom were happy to talk to him, breaking confidentiality agreements to give him insider scoop. From their stories, Uberstar is an authoritative account of what really takes place in the reality TV world.

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Uberstar focuses on every aspect of the

reality TV

phenomenon. Aspiring contestants can gain valuable insights into the minds of the producers, publicists, how the voting process is fixed, how to get on the show, and perhaps even how to stay there. Alaine-Marshall delves deep into the minds of the contestants and shows how to put your best foot forward to maximize your chances for selection on the show. For any aspiring singers/actors out there looking for the big break, Uberstar has the answers you are looking for.

Alaine-Marshall skillfully weaves the story of the participants along with revealing insights into the cogs of the Idol machinery. People have been watching Indian Idol since its inception in January 2004, and the series today commands an impressive viewership of 27 million. Curious fans of the Indian Idol series will appreciate Uberstar because it reveals so many hidden facets of what they always wanted to know about the show.

In short, whatever your interest in reality shows, whether you would like to be in one, or you are an enthusiastic and avid watcher, or even if you are simply curious about it, Uberstar is sure to knock your socks off with its revelations and insights into the reality TV industry.

Order your home delivered copy online right away! Uberstar is available at www.uberstarthebook.com To find out more about Vaughn Alaine-Marshall, go to http://www.Uberstarthebook.com.au/index.aspx?page=11

Australian author Vaughn Alaine-Marshall releases berstar from Hendlin Books, an explosive look at the reality television. Based largely on

reality shows

such as American Idol, India has Talent and other successful reality shows. The author s research included interviews with participants, producers and insiders from the world s largest reality television shows. for more: http://www.uberstarthebook.com.au/

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Caribou plays the Bowery Ballroom

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Tuesday, November 6, 2007 

Daniel Snaith, better known as Caribou, formerly known as Manitoba until a lawsuit by musician Richard “Handsome Dick” Manitoba, recently played New York City’s Bowery Ballroom. Below is Wikinews reporter David Shankbone’s conversation with the electronica pioneer.

David Shankbone: How is the tour going?

DS: How do European and American audiences compare to each other?

DS: But they are more electronic in Europe than they are here, right?

DS: You reach the same fans in each place?

DS: Do you play to larger audiences over there or here?

DS: Do you have a favorite venue?

DS: What would be a dream venue to play?

DS: Is there a continent you haven’t played where you would like to?

DS: Rio or São Paulo?

DS: How has the Iraq War affected you as an artist?

DS: Has it affected you as a person?

DS: Do you find you’re more inspired by manmade things or things in nature?

DS: What sort of ideas inspire you?

DS: Would you consider your music to be mathematical?

DS: Do you have a favorite mathematician or unsolved mathematical problem?

DS: What’s a trait you deplore in other people?

DS: What’s a trait you deplore in yourself?

DS: You think that might be a negative?

DS: That’s a challenge for any human of whether or not to pursue something you think is a greater good or indulge yourself. How do you wrestle with that question?

DS: Well, we need music in this world and if people are responding to it, you’re giving something to them.

DS: Maybe. [Laughs] Hillary or Barack?

DS: What do you think of Gordon Brown?

DS: What would be a bigger turn-off for you in bed, someone who was overly flatulent, or someone who spoke in a baby voice?

DS: Do you have a favorite curse word?

DS: Favorite euphemism for breasts?

DS: If you had to choose between the destruction of the entire continent of Africa or the entire continent of Asia, which would you choose?

DS: What are traits you respect in a woman?

DS: It doesn’t differ in men?

DS: What’s your most treasured possession?

DS: Any favorite films?

DS: What difficult question in an interview do you anticipate but are never asked?

DS: What question are you tired of answering?

DS: In the last year, where have you drawn most of your influence, and you can’t have been listening to them beyond a year ago.

Acting teacher and director Milton Katselas dies at age 75

By |

Tuesday, October 28, 2008 

Acting teacher and director Milton Katselas died Friday at age 75, after suffering from heart failure at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California. He began the Beverly Hills Playhouse in 1978 and taught acting classes there to noted actors including George Clooney and Gene Hackman. Katselas is survived by a sister and two brothers.

Katselas directed an off-Broadway production of Edward Albee’s The Zoo Story, and received a Tony Award nomination for his 1969 direction of Butterflies are Free. Actress Blythe Danner won a Tony Award for her role in Butterflies are Free under Katselas’ direction. He moved to California to direct the film version of that play, and went on to direct films and television movies. Actress Eileen Heckart received an Academy Award for her role in the film version of Butterflies are Free.

Katselas directed the San Francisco and Los Angeles productions of the play P.S. Your Cat Is Dead! by playwright James Kirkwood, Jr. In his author’s notes in the publication of the script, Kirkwood acknowledged Katselas, and wrote that the plays were “directed with incredible energy and enthusiasm by Milton Katselas, to whom I am extremely indebted”.

Katselas directed the television movie Strangers: Story of a Mother and Daughter, and actress Bette Davis received an Emmy Award for her role in the movie. Katselas taught many famous actors including Michelle Pfeiffer, Richard Gere, Robert Duvall, Jack Lemmon, Al Pacino, Goldie Hawn, Christopher Walken, Burt Reynolds, George C. Scott, Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, Alec Baldwin, and Patrick Swayze. Katselas was credited with being able to nurture actors with raw talent so that they could develop strong Hollywood careers. He utilized innovative techniques in his courses – one course called “Terrorist Theatre” had a simple premise: successfully get an acting role within six weeks or leave the course.

He grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to parents who had immigrated from Greece, and graduated from Carnegie Mellon. He studied acting with Lee Strasberg in New York at the Actors Studio, and received advice from directors Joshua Logan and Elia Kazan.

Katselas was a prominent Scientologist, and a July 2007 profile on Katselas in The New York Times Magazine observed that some of his students stopped taking courses at the Beverly Hills Playhouse because they felt they had been pressured to join the Church of Scientology. According to the article, Katselas credited Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard “for much of his success in life”, and one of his students works at Scientology’s Celebrity Centre. The article commented that some in Los Angeles view the Beverly Hills Playhouse as “a recruitment center for Scientology”.

Katselas met L. Ron Hubbard after moving to California, and began studying Scientology in 1965. The New York Times Magazine reported that he had reached the level of “Operating Thetan, Level 5, or O.T. V.” in 2007. According to The New York Times Magazine when Scientologists proceed up the “The Bridge to Total Freedom” they learn the story of Xenu, and that: “75 million years ago the evil alien Xenu solved galactic overpopulation by dumping 13.5 trillion beings in volcanoes on Earth, where they were vaporized, scattering their souls.” A Church of Scientology publication, Source, lists Katselas as reaching O.T. V. in 1989.

Though some actors felt pressured to join the Church of Scientology after taking courses at the Beverly Hills Playhouse, at least one individual felt Katselas was not active enough with the organization. Actress Jenna Elfman left the Beverly Hills Playhouse because she felt Katselas was not committed enough to Scientology. Katselas had previously directed Elfman in half of Visions and Lovers: Variations on a Theme, two one-act plays about relationships that he had written himself. In 1999 Katselas had planned to adapt the script of Visions and Lovers to a film version, and Elfman was set to reprise her role from the play. In an article in Variety about the project, Elfman commented on her experience working with Katselas: “He is brilliant, and knows me so well as a person and an actress that he gets the most out of me.”

Other prominent Scientologist actors who have studied under Katselas include Giovanni Ribisi, Jason Lee, and Leah Remini. According to Rolling Stone, Katselas also recruited actress Kelly Preston to Scientology. Actress Nancy Cartwright (the voice of Bart Simpson), told Scientology publication Celebrity that Katselas motivated her to get more active in Scientology, and she stated she took the organization’s “Purification Rundown” and her life “took off completely”.

Anne Archer was introduced to Scientology while studying at the Beverly Hills Playhouse, as was former Scientologist and now outspoken critic actor Jason Beghe. Beghe told Roger Friedman of FOX News in April 2008 that “He [Katselas] gets kickbacks”, and that he was brought to a Scientology center by fellow Beverly Hills Playhouse classmate Bodhi Elfman, Jenna Elfman’s husband. In a 1998 article for Buzz Magazine, Randye Hoder wrote “In his class, Katselas is careful not to label anything as a tenet of Scientology, but there is no question that the church’s influence seeps into the playhouse.”

Anne Archer’s husband and fellow Scientologist, producer Terry Jastrow, commented to The New York Times Magazine that Katselas changed the way he experiences life on a day-to-day basis: “I go out in the world and look at human behavior now. I see a woman or man interacting with a saleslady, and I see the artistry in it. Life is an endless unspooling of art, of acting, of painting, of architecture. And where did I learn that? From Milton.”

Actor Anthony Head of Buffy the Vampire Slayer spoke highly of Katselas in a 2002 interview with San Francisco Chronicle: “He’s this wonderfully intuitive teacher and his premise is basically: The only real barriers are the ones we put in front of ourselves. If you say, ‘My character wouldn’t do that’ — bollocks! Ultimately it’s you who wouldn’t say that. Who knows what your character might do.” In the acknowledgements of her 2004 autobiography Are You Hungry, Dear?: Life, Laughs, and Lasagna, actress Doris Roberts wrote: “I thank my friend and acting teacher, the incredible Milton Katselas, for his insights, wisdom, and inspiration, which have helped make me the actress that I am.”

Katselas authored two books: Dreams Into Action: Getting What You Want, first published in 1996 by Dove Books, and Acting Class: Take a Seat, which came out earlier this month. Dreams Into Action, a New York Times Bestseller, sought to modify motivational acting exercises to the field of business.

In an interview in the 2007 book Acting Teachers of America, Katselas commented on his experiences as an acting teacher over the years: “I have very special teachers here at the Beverly Hills Playhouse—some have been with me for over twenty-five years. I believe that to make a difference over the long haul, we need to train teachers. I really care about the craft of acting. It’s absolutely necessary to take the time and patience to really develop an actor.”

Good Omens to be made into BBC radio drama

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Sunday, September 7, 2014 

Plans for a radio dramatisation of the novel Good Omens, co-written by prominent UK fantasy authors Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, were confirmed on Friday by BBC Radio 4.

Published in 1990, Good Omens tells the story of the impending Apocalypse, and the efforts of one angel and one demon to save the world.

Neil Gaiman has previously had one of his books, Neverwhere, adapted for radio. The director of that adaptation, Dirk Maggs, is also working on Good Omens.

Terry Pratchett is well known for his Discworld novels, of which the first one, Colour of Magic, was published in 1983.

Recording for what would be the first ever dramatisation of the cult-classic began on Friday, with broadcast dates unconfirmed but said to be in December. The show is expected to broadcast over five days throughout the week and an hour-long finale on the Saturday.

Mark Heap and Peter Serafinowicz have been cast in the lead roles, with other actors on the cast list including Colin Morgan, Josie Lawrence and Clive Russell. Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett are also expected to make cameo appearances.